We have curated a multimedia library of content developed both by Switchboard and by former ORR-funded TA providers. You can browse the library by resource type, view a full list of uploads, or use the search area to access content by topic, author, year, and more.
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Your search yielded 68 result(s).

Blog Post: Supporting Clients Experiencing Housing Insecurity: Tips and Multilingual Materials on Housing Relief Legislation

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: January 19, 2021
Topic(s): Housing, Safety
Subtopic(s): Federal Housing Programs, Landlords
As many clients continue to experience financial hardship due to the effects of COVID-19, service providers are offering support by helping to navigate pandemic relief measures. This post shares eviction prevention and rent assistance information related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including multilingual information where available.

Blog Post: What Can You Expect from Switchboard in the New Year? Findings from our External Evaluation and Needs Assessment

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: December 17, 2020
Topic(s): Monitoring and Evaluation
Subtopic(s): Data Analysis, Data Collection, Using Data and Evidence
As a Switchboard team, we’re always interested in learning more about how we’re doing, how we can improve, and which topics are on refugee service providers’ minds. This is why we worked with an external evaluator to look back at our work from the previous year to reflect on our project and identify how we could improve. We also conducted a needs assessment to hear from you and inform our priorities for the coming year. Thank you to all who participated! We would like to share some of the main findings with you.

Blog Post: Refugees and Asylees Have the Right to Work: Overcoming Two Key Challenges when Communicating with Employers about Work Authorization

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: November 13, 2020
Topic(s): Case Management, Employment, Immigration Legal Needs
Subtopic(s): Employment Rights
This second post in a two-part series that was informed by conversations with Senior Trial Attorney Liza Zamd from the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division’s Immigrant and Employee Rights Section. It provides tips on overcoming two common challenges when employers request specific documents from refugees and asylees as they complete the I-9.

Blog Post: Refugees and Asylees Have the Right to Work: Busting Three Myths about Social Security Delays & Work Authorization

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: November 13, 2020
Topic(s): Case Management, Employment, Immigration Legal Needs
Subtopic(s): Employment Rights
This is the first post in a two-part series that was informed by conversations with Senior Trial Attorney Liza Zamd from the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division’s Immigrant and Employee Rights Section. It covers three common misconceptions held by both employers and service providers regarding work authorization, and shares additional useful resources.

Blog Post: Talking about Race and Racism: Tips for Conversations with Refugee Youth

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: October 9, 2020
Topic(s): Case Management
As a young person, adjusting to a new place is difficult no matter the circumstances. In adapting to their new communities, refugee youth need to understand how race and racism may shape their lives in the U.S., including the history of systemic racism and discrimination, the history of anti-racist movements, and what they need to know about current events like protests against police brutality.

Blog Post: Talking about Race and Racism: Tips for Participating in Introductory Conversations

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: October 9, 2020
Topic(s): Case Management
Conversations about race are challenging, but they allow people to get to know one another better and build stronger communities. It is important for newcomers to have a better understanding about racism in America, how it may affect their daily lives, and what they can do to change it. It is equally important that refugee service providers consider the adjustments, new information, and learning curves newcomers face. Providers must take those into account as they think about when, where, and how to introduce topics about race, racism, and anti-racism with clients.

Blog Post: Talking about Race and Racism: Preparing for Conversations with Refugee Clients

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: October 9, 2020
Topic(s): Case Management
Refugee service providers play an important role in helping newcomers integrate into communities across the country. As they adjust to their new life in America, many refugees and their family members are likely to experience racism or discrimination first-hand. In our role as providers, managers, and evaluators of services that help newcomers successfully integrate into U.S. communities, we must be willing and able to have meaningful conversations about race and racism with refugees.

Blog Post: Supporting Refugees and Immigrants to Complete the 2020 Census During COVID-19

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: July 23, 2020
Topic(s): Community Engagement, Immigration Legal Needs
Subtopic(s): COVID-19
On March 3rd, Switchboard hosted a webinar on the 2020 US Census. Since then, many things about the 2020 Census have changed due to COVID-19. This post shares updates and suggestions for Census outreach in the new environment.

Blog Post: Remote Job Readiness Resources for Clients with Lower Levels of Digital Literacy

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: July 15, 2020
Topic(s): Adult Education, Case Management, Employment
Subtopic(s): Job Readiness
We recently published a blog post on Virtual Job Readiness Resources for Clients With Online Access. But how are agencies continuing job readiness training when participants don’t have access to technology or lack digital literacy skills? This post includes job readiness resources for supporting clients without online access and/or digital skills, informed by strategies refugee service providers have begun implementing nationwide.

Blog Post: Three Steps You Can Take to Support Clients’ Food Security

Author(s): Switchboard
Date: June 25, 2020
Topic(s): Case Management, Health
Subtopic(s): Food Security and Nutrition
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused profound disruption across the globe, including in the U.S., which in late March became the country with the highest number of confirmed cases. The crisis is exacerbating existing economic and social inequality for many refugee and immigrant populations and their communities.